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Sunday, December 27, 2015

Please Don't Forget to RSVP!


If you haven't already done so, please RSVP for Special Events at SLIG  

We need your RSVP for special events, including the banquet and reception, so we can be prepared for your participation.  If you have not already done this, please follow these instructions:

  • Click on “use this link” just above "Personal Information" to update your existing registration
  • Enter your email address you registered and your SLIG registration confirmation number.  
  • Click on “Retrieve Registration”
  • You should be able to add everything there from special considerations to the banquet.
  • If you indicate you are attending the banquet, it will bring up another drop-down for the meal selection.
  • Click on “Submit Updated Registration” 

Thursday, December 10, 2015

SLIG Announces 2017 and 2018 dates

Recent changes in the Salt Lake City meeting landscape brought an early holiday present to the Salt Lake Institute of Genealogy – better meeting dates!

SLIG is pleased to announce that it will continue to be held at the Hilton Salt Lake City Center, and will move to the fourth week of January beginning with the 2017 program. 

Outdoor Retailer, a large city-wide convention bringing over 20,000 attendees to Salt Lake and Park City areas for their annual Winter Market, recently changed dates.  Commonly known as OR, the program has traditionally been held during the third week of January and literally fills every hotel room along the Wasatch Front during that time.  In order to maintain reasonable hotel pricing and accommodate extended stays for research, SLIG was wedged between the end of the holidays and the arrival of OR. “While it worked,” states Peg A. Ivanyo, current SLIG director, “it would never be described as ‘ideal’.”

Summer rumors of changes brought temporary fear to the SLIG committee, who had already opened registration for the 2016 program.  “A program that large has enough clout to boot even one with over 20 years of tradition out of town” stated Ivanyo.  “We had Hilton support and a promise not to cancel our contract if OR decided to overlap with SLIG dates, but being literally on top of each other would have introduced other problems such as increased airline costs and long lines at local eateries.” 

The eventual announcement that OR would move to dates ‘just prior to’ SLIG’s normal week brought a long sigh of relief.  It also set the stage for SLIG to negotiate similar pricing for dates much later in January during a better timeframe.


The date change "provides the opportunity for our participants who wish to tack on an additional week for research to arrive early, stay late, or even stretch their stay into February for RootsTech in 2017,” states Ivanyo.  

Dates for both 2017 and 2018 are posted on the website, slig.ugagenealogy.org.  Courses for 2017 will be announced at the 2016 banquet; seats are available for several 2016 courses.

Don't Miss Out on SLIG Night at the Family History Library!

If you would like some hands-on assistance, don't miss out on the 45-minute consultations that are being offered on Wednesday, January 13th when SLIG holds "SLIG Night at the Family History Library."

Consultations are being offered in the following areas of research:

  • Czech Republic
  • England
  • Germany (Unfortunately, this one is already SOLD OUT.)
  • Latin America
  • Norway
  • Sweden
  • Great Plains Region: Kansas, Nebraska, North Dakota, Oklahoma, South Dakota, and Texas
  • Gulf-South Region: Alabama, Arkansas, Georgie, Florida, Louisiana, Mississippi, and Texas
  • Mid-Atlantic Region: Delaware, New Jersey, Maryland, New York, and Pennsylvania
  • Mid-South Region: Kentucky, Missouri, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia, and West Virginia
  • Midwest Region: Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Ohio, and Wisconsin (Unfortunately, this one is already SOLD OUT.)
  • New England Region: Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, and Vermont
Go to http://ugagenealogy.org/aem.php?lv=p&epg=101&eid=16 for more information.

Wednesday, November 25, 2015

Happy Thanksgiving!

May you and your family enjoy a very Happy Thanksgiving!



Thursday, November 19, 2015

Have a Southern research problem? Let SLIG's Problem Solving Course help!

Have a Southern brick wall in your research? Let Luana and her team of Southern research experts assist you in breaking down your brick wall!

This unique problem solving course is tailored to your individual research needs! Enhance your problem solving skills while working on your ancestral brick walls. Develop methodology, analysis, and research skills while focusing on your own project, using resources from the Family History Library.

Student involvement in problem solving requires commitment and advance preparation. It is divided into two parts:

Pre-Institute: Choose a project focus, ancestor, time period, geographical area, and research questions. Project submission can include timeline, pertinent pedigree and family group sheets, research logs, maps, and a short research summary, detailing what is known information and a discussion of sources used in previous research. Assigned consultants will return an initial analysis of the student's proposed research on Sunday at Institute.

Institute: Under guidance from professional consultants, student's will use a group collaborative approach to discuss research progress each day, utilizing the combined knowledge and experience of the group to solve problems.

Please note that shuttles do not run during the regular part of the day and student may be on their own for transportation to the FHL for research. It is a two-block (Salt Lake City block) walk.

Coordinator:

Luana Darby, MLIS

Consultants:

Craig Scott, CG (Southern states)

Paul Graham, AG, CG (Southern states)

Wednesday, November 11, 2015

Nicole Larue on SLIG's Advanced Evidence Practicum


Are you considering enrolling in SLIG's Advanced Evidence Practicum? Angela McGhie on her blog Adventures in Genealogy Education invited Nicole LaRue to "write a guest post on the Advanced Evidence Analysis Practicum course at the Salt Lake Institute of Genealogy, as she has taken the course before, and she is registered again in 2016. Why would someone take the same course twice?"

Read the blog at http://genealogyeducation.blogspot.com and find out! 

To register for one of the few remaining seats, to http://ugagenealogy.org/aem.php?lv=r&eid=16.

Tuesday, November 3, 2015

SLIG Offers In-Depth Learning on 19th-21st Century U.S. Resources

SLIG offers a beyond-the-basics two-year course, which provides in-depth learning on 19th - 21st century U.S. resources and the methodology for using them. Coordinator Paula Stuart-Warren and her expert instructors help students probe deeper into the content, origin, location, and interpretation of records. Informative and interactive classroom hours delve into significant records and strategies that take you beyond basic research tools both online and off. On-site Family History Library support and a computer lab from course instructors provide one-on-one assistance and guidance with your own research.

Suggested prerequisites: Experience researching in a variety of repositories, familiarity with FamilySearch.org and other family history websites, reviewing at least two basic genealogy guidebooks, and previous class room learning related to family history.

Note: These do not need to be taken in any particular order. Part I will be taught again in 2017 and includes hands-on dissecting a document and a class project; researching women; courthouse records, legal savvy; source citations; computer lab, land records; passenger arrival records; passports; WPA, National Archives, and genealogical and historical periodicals.

For more information, go to http://ugagenealogy.org/aem.php?lv=p&epg=87&eid=16.

Sunday, November 1, 2015

The SLIG Practicum...Test Your Research Skills!

This hands-on experience is an opportunity for advanced genealogists to challenge themselves and put their research skills into practice. Participants work on five complex genealogical research problems—a new one each day. The objective is to give students experience in conducting research on complex problems, analyzing and correlating information, and reaching conclusions. Participants will practice using indirect evidence, broadening research to include the FAN club, resolving conflicts, and organizing evidence into a written summary. The research problems are varied, offering students the challenge of stretching their mind and skills in directions that their research may not normally take them.
Participants will work individually on the each of the cases and then gather to discuss their progress with fellow classmates and the instructor. They will compare sources, strategies and methodologies, discuss difficulties encountered, and receive guidance from the case study author. This course is designed for advanced genealogists who have sufficient experience and education to work on complex genealogical problems.

The cases this year will be presented by:
  • Nancy Peters, CG
  • Paul Graham, AG, CG
  • Michael Hait, CG
  • Cathi Becker Desmarais, CG
  • Angela Packer McGhie

For more information see http://ugagenealogy.org/aem.php?lv=p&epg=87&eid=16. To register, go to http://ugagenealogy.org/aem.php?lv=r&eid=16. Don't miss the opportunity to elevate your education!

Tuesday, October 27, 2015

Elevate Your Education!

Come to the Salt Lake Institute of Genealogy in January 2016!


It is the place to meet up with old friends, make new friends and take your genealogical education to a whole new level! 

Friday, October 23, 2015

Do You Have a Genealogical Brick Wall?



If your answer to that question is yes, then Luana Darby can help! She is the coordinator for SLIG's unique problem solving course that is tailored to your individual research needs! 

Enhance your problem solving skills while working on your ancestral brick walls. Develop methodology, analysis, and research skills while focusing on your own project, using resources from the Family History Library.

The 2016 course has experts from New England and the South to provide one-on-one assistance to students. How often do you have to opportunity to obtain expert guided research services as well as access to the Family History Library?

Students will be divided into small groups by geographic regions or countries and will meet as a group for two hours each day to review research progress (with one to two professional consultants, depending on group size). To assure more cohesive groups, focus areas have been pre-selected. Fee shown includes regular tuition plus a consultant fee.

Student involvement in problem solving requires commitment and advance preparation. It is divided into two parts:

Pre-Institute: Choose a project focus, ancestor, time period, geographical area, and research questions. Project submission can include timeline, pertinent pedigree and family group sheets, research logs, maps, and a short research summary, detailing what is known information and a discussion of sources used in previous research. Assigned consultants will return an initial analysis of the student's proposed research on Sunday at Institute.

Institute: Under guidance from professional consultants, student's will use a group collaborative approach to discuss research progress each day, utilizing the combined knowledge and experience of the group to solve problems.

Please note that shuttles do not run during the regular part of the day and student may be on their own for transportation to the FHL for research. It is a two-block (Salt Lake City block) walk.

Geographic research focus areas:

  • New England
  • Southern United States

For more information and to register, go to http://ugagenealogy.org/aem.php?lv=p&epg=87&eid=16.

Tuesday, October 20, 2015

What is New at The Salt Lake Institute of Genealogy (SLIG)?


The Salt Lake Institute of Genealogy (SLIG) appears to be headed into a record-setting year, with over 330 people registered to date for the 21st annual event.  Participants from 45 states, the District of Columbia, Canada, and the Netherlands will converge at the Hilton Salt Lake City Center in 11-15 January 2016.

Built on the strength of the past with an eye to the future, SLIG remains in the forefront of genealogical education offering courses taught by the best instructors the industry has to offer - in fact, the post-nominals behind the names of the course coordinators often take more space to print than the course titles themselves! To listen to them personally, refer to posts on the UGA blog outlining their upcoming speaking engagements.

Earlier this year we celebrated twenty years of offering in-depth genealogical education by introducing a new logo, a new slogan (Elevate Your Genealogical Education), and expanded to thirteen courses. Now, we are pleased to announce a new evening event - SLIG Night at the Family History Library.  Sponsored by The International Commission for the Accreditation of Professional Genealogists (ICAPGen), and hosted by the Family History Library (FHL), the event will offer classes, labs, area-specific consultations, and light refreshments on Wednesday, 13 January 2016 from 6:00 to 9:00 pm.


Other events for the 2016 institute include:

  • Rev. Dr. David McDonald, CG, will deliver “Thinking Genealogically,” at the plenary session, Monday 11 January 2016, 7:00 pm. He notes: “A researcher should incorporate evaluative and interpretive skills to be a more effective researcher.  These abilities can become second nature over the course of a genealogical career.”
  • The highly acclaimed, award-winning blogger, The Legal Genealogist, Judy G. Russell, JD, CG, CGL, will deliver the banquet keynote address, Friday 15 January 2016. The title should be announced later this month, but with Judy speaking, who needs to know the title?
And last, but not least on the list of “what’s new”, SLIG will move to new dates beginning in 2017 - still in January, but a little later in the month.  Don’t forget to check out the new dates and available courses on the UGA website.

For more information please visit the SLIG website at www.slig.ugagenealogy.org

Thursday, October 8, 2015

"Mull and Ponder" with J. Mark Lowe!


SLIG's own course coordinator and instructor, J. Mark Lowe, will be presenting at the following events for the remainder of 2015:

October 10, 2015
Genealogical Research Institute of Virginia
Midlothian, Virginia

October 31 – November 1, 2015
Texas State Genealogical society Conference
Austin, Texas

November 6-7, 2015
Sevier County Tennessee Public Library – Genealogy Conference Sevierville, Tennessee

November 14, 2015
West Florida Genealogical Society Fall Seminar
Pensacola, Florida

December 12, 2015
McCracken County Kentucky Genealogy Seminar
Paducah, Kentucky

Mark is the coordinator for the course entitled "Swing Across the South," which will be held at SLIG in 2016. While this course is sold out for 2016, it is an essential course for those conducting Southern research.

Southern research requires a careful understanding of how records were created, and how they have been maintained since their creation. Consideration of lost or missing records is included. The approach is interactive, with more time spent looking at records. Each day will start with a developed plan, leading to wise record choices, continuing with the analysis of information, followed with properly cited discoveries, ending with a review of evidence and a summary of what was learned, while leaving a next step for tomorrow. Additionally, the course covers basic records from Alabama, George, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland, Missouri, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Virginia and even Tennessee.

There are sti
ll eight courses left that have seats remaining for the 2016 institute. For more information, go to http://ugagenealogy.org/aem.php?lv=p&epg=87&eid=16.

Tuesday, October 6, 2015

Judy Russell's Whirlwind Schedule

SLIG's own course coordinator and instructor, Judy Russell, will be presenting at the following events for the remainder of 2015:

October 7th
Historical Society of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
"An Evening with Judy Russell"
http://hsp.org/calendar/an-evening-with-judy-russell-the-legal-genealogist

October 9th
Church History Museum Auditorium, Salt Lake City, Utah
“After the Courthouse Burns: Rekindling Family History Through DNA,”
http://blog.bcgcertification.org

Octobr 17th
Louisville Genealogical Society, Louisville, Kentucky
Family History Seminar and Book Fair
http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~kylgs/seminar1.htm

October 24th
Indiana State Library, Indianapolis, Indiana
Genealogy and Local History Fair
http://blog.library.in.gov

October 30th & 31st
North Hills Genealogy, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
Fall Conference
http://www.northhillsgenealogists.org/upload/files/NHGFall2015BrochureLetter(2).pdf

November 7th
Fairfax Genealogical Society, Dunn Loring, Virginia
12th Annual Fall Fair
http://fxgs.org/cpage.php?pt=21

November 14, 2015
Hudson County Genealogical Society, Secaucus Public Library
"Genealogy and DNA"
http://www.hudsoncountynjgenealogy.org/events.html

December 5th
Bucks County, Pennsylvania, David Library of the American Revolution
"Autosomal DNA Testing"
http://www.bucksgen.org/index.php/bcgs-programs

Judy is the coordinator for the course entitled "Corpus Juris: Advanced Legal Concepts for Genealogy," which will be held at SLIG in 2016. While this course is sold out for 2016, it should be on everyone's list to take to improve their knowledge and skills as a genealogist.

Judy's course offers students an opportunity for a deeper understanding of the rich research resources of the law, including those generally available only at law libraries. Students will work with legal records and sources, gaining a better grasp of legal history and its implications for research as well as the skills to find and apply the law to solve genealogical problems. Individual sessions will focus on specific legal disciplines (criminal, civil, naturalization and the like) and students will have the opportunity to visit and use the resources of a major university law library.

There are still eight courses left that have seats remaining for the 2016 institute. For more information, go to http://ugagenealogy.org/aem.php?lv=p&epg=87&eid=16.

Friday, October 2, 2015

Angela McGhie's Upcoming Presentations

Angela Packer McGhie has focused her career in genealogy education. She is a course coordinator at the Salt Lake Institute of Genealogy (SLIG) and at the Institute of Genealogy and Historical Research (IGHR). She has been an instructor at the National Institute for Genealogy Research in Washington, D.C., and the Genealogical Research Institute of Pittsburgh. Angela served as the administrator of the ProGen Study Program from 2008-2014 and is now on the board of directors.

Her upcoming presentations for the remainder of 2015 are:

October 8th
New Jersey Chapter of APG
"Writing a Business Plan"

November 4th
Prince Georges County (Maryland) Genealogical Society
"Using Identity Characteristics to Locate Your Ancestors"

Angela is the coordinator for the Advanced Evidence Practicum, which will be held at SLIG in 2016. The course provides hands-on experience and is an opportunity for advanced genealogists to challenge themselves and put their research skills into practice. Participants work on five complex genealogical research problems—a new one each day. The objective is to give students experience in conducting research on complex problems, analyzing and correlating information, and reaching conclusions. Participants will practice using indirect evidence, broadening research to include the FAN club, resolving conflicts, and organizing evidence into a written summary. The research problems are varied, offering students the challenge of stretching their mind and skills in directions that their research may not normally take them.


Participants will work individually on the each of the cases and then gather to discuss their progress with fellow classmates and the instructor. They will compare sources, strategies and methodologies, discuss difficulties encountered, and receive guidance from the case study author. This course is designed for advanced genealogists who have sufficient experience and education to work on complex genealogical problems.

The 2016 cases will be presented by:

  • Nancy A. Peters, CG
  • Paul Graham, AG, CG
  • Michael Hait, CG
  • Cathy Becker Desmarias, CG
  • Angela Packer McGhie
For more information, go to http://ugagenealogy.org/aem.php?lv=p&epg=87&eid=16. There are only a few seats remaining, so register today!


Thursday, October 1, 2015

Future SLIG Dates Announced!



Due to changes with other Salt Lake City programs, SLIG has been able to secure dates later in the month of January at the same reasonable rates we have previously enjoyed. Please mark your calendars:

2017: 22-27 January

2018: 21-26 January

Background: SLIG dates were previously locked into the second week of January by a large (over 20,000 attendees) convention called Outdoor Retailer (OR) that met annually on the third week of January. OR has recently moved their dates earlier in January, freeing up the last two weeks of the month for consideration. By moving to the fourth week of the month, we have the ability to offer rooms both prior to and following SLIG for those wishing to come early or stay late for research or other programs.

Location: SLIG will continue to be held at the Hilton Salt Lake City Center. Lodging reservations will open in June at the same time as SLIG registration each year. We kindly request that you wait to reserve your room at that time and that you utilize the reservation method posted on this website to assure that you are booked inside the block and at the contracted rate. Fulfilling our contracted block committment is key to maintaining economical participant fees each year.

See http://ugagenealogy.org/cpage.php?pt=396 for the announcement and for more information on the 2016 Salt Lake Institute for Genealogy.

Friday, September 25, 2015

Learn from Renowned Genealogist, Tom Jones...


SLIG's own course coordinator and instructor, Thomas W. Jones, will be presenting at the following events over the next month:

New York State Family History Conference
Syracuse, N.Y.; 16–19 September 2015
“Can a Complex Research Problem be Solved Solely Online?”
“Will Your Family History Have Lasting Value?”
“The Genealogical Proof Standard (GPS): What It is and What It is Not”

Maryland Genealogical SocietyColumbia, Md.; 3 October 2015
“Solving the Mystery of the Disappearing Ancestor”
“Missing Something? Getting the Most Out of Genealogical Evidence”
“Can a Complex Research Problem be Solved Solely Online?”
“Going Beyond the Bare Bones: Reconstructing Your Ancestors’ Lives”

Board for Certification of Genealogists–Family History Library Day of Skillbuilding LecturesSalt Lake City, Utah; 9 October 2015
“When Does Newfound Evidence Overturn a Proved Conclusion?”

Seattle Genealogical Society
Seattle, Washington; 17 October 2015
“Can a Complex Research Problem be Solved Solely Online?”
“Five Ways to Prove Who Your Ancestor Was (Some Reliable and Others Not Reliable)”
“Inferential Genealogy: Deducing Ancestors’ Identities Indirectly”
“Solving the Mystery of the Disappearing Ancestor”

Tom is the coordinator for Course 10: Advanced Genealogical Methods. While this course is sold out for 2016, it should be on everyone's list to take to improve their knowledge and skills as a genealogist.

Students in Advanced Genealogical Methods will learn how to use and assemble evidence to rediscover ancestral origins, identities, and relationships that have been forgotten in the passage of time. The course will address advanced use of evidence from a variety of genealogical records and research in populations for which the usual records are in short supply (including female, enslaved, and impoverished ancestors). Students also will learn how to develop written proof summaries to show their conclusions’ accuracy and create a credible record of their findings for present and future generations of family historians.

There are still eight courses left that have seats remaining for the 2016 institute. For more information, go to http://ugagenealogy.org/aem.php?lv=p&epg=87&eid=16.

Tuesday, September 22, 2015

Looking for Paula?




SLIG's own course coordinator, Paula Stuart-Warren will be quite busy this Fall and Winter speaking at the following events:

September 25-26, 2015
Minnesota Genealogical Society North Star Family History Conference, West St. Paul and Edina, Minnesota. One workshop and two other presentations

North Little Rock, Arkansas. Four presentations

October 10, 2015
Anchorage Genealogical Society Fall Seminar
Anchorage, Alaska. Four presentations

October 23-24, 2015
Illinois State Genealogical Society Fall Conference
Oak Lawn, Illinois. Four presentations

November 18, 2015, Wednesday, Virtual Presentation
South Bay Cities Genealogical Society
Torrance, California. One presentation

December 2, 2015, Wednesday, Webinar: The U.S. National Archives: The Nation’s Attic
Minnesota Genealogical Society

Paula specializes in genealogical and historical research, lecturing, consulting, and writing. Her lectures, research, and consultations for individuals, societies, law firms, and Indian tribes seeking records and advice has taken her to many states, courthouses, archives, historical societies, and libraries.

Paula's course next year, Intermediate U.S. Records and Research, Part II, goes beyond-the-basics and provides in-depth learning on 19th - 21st century U.S. resources and the methodology for using them. Students will learn to probe deeper into the content, origin, location, and interpretation of records. Informative and interactive classroom hours delve into significant records and strategies that take you beyond basic research tools both online and off. On-site Family History Library support and a computer lab from course instructors provide one-on-one assistance and guidance with your own research.

Seats are limited, so register now for a wonderful educational opportunity with a knowledgeable and respected genealogy professional. For more information, go to http://ugagenealogy.org/aem.php?lv=p&epg=87&eid=16.

Friday, September 18, 2015

Researching New York: Resources and Strategies



Research in New York is complicated by its urban-rural extremes and its 400-year, multi-ethnic history. This course tackles those complexities, arming the researcher with the knowledge needed for success in this difficult state. The course covers New York’s history as it impacts the researcher, and examines in detail the records that have been created and preserved. Broad topics include immigration/migration, laws and the legal system, military records, ethnic groups, vital records, land and property, urban research, turnpikes/canals/railroads, local government/institutional records, probate, newspapers, directories, censuses, and more.

This class is geared toward intermediate and advanced level researchers. Attendees should have basic knowledge of genealogical methods and sources, and be ready to go beyond that base into the lesser-known methods and sources specific to successful New York research.

The course is filling up, so register now! For more information, see http://ugagenealogy.org/aem.php?lv=p&epg=87&eid=16.

Tuesday, September 15, 2015

Registration for the Salt Lake Institute of Genealogy is Ongoing!



Did you know that UGA members receive a $50.00 discount on registration?

The 2016 institute program has seats available in several amazing courses. Those new to the institute, or wanting to make sure they have a solid foundation, may wish to study under Paula Stuart-Warren in US Records and Research. The program opens with a welcome reception on Sunday, January 10, 2016 and wraps up with a banquet, Friday, January 15. The program will be followed by the second annual SLIG Colloquium, where genealogy thought leaders convene to review papers on hot topics of the day. UGA members reap the benefit as the papers are subsequently published in CrossRoad magazine.

Registrations for the institute are presently being accepted as well as lodging reservations for those who wish to stay at on-site at the Hilton SLC Downtown. Evening events will be announced in next month’s e-news. Complete information about course availability may be found at slig.ugagenealogy.org.

For more information please visit the SLIG website atwww.slig.ugagenealogy.org

Wednesday, September 9, 2015

Learn from the storytelling master!



You’ve gathered a lot of information about your ancestors. Now it’s time to tell their stories. Using vivid examples and case studies, this course demonstrates how to compile your material; write biography; choose a numbering system; document, edit and proofread your text; and publish the saga of your family - on paper or electronically. Classes explore how to enliven your prose with family lore, treasured heirlooms, local history, maps, and illustrations.

One in-class writing exercise with follow-up critique helps you improve practical skills, share your talents, and exchange ideas with the instructors and fellow students.

John's website can be found at http://www.genealogyjohn.com. The following is taken from his biographical information:

"John Philip Colletta is one of America’s most popular genealogical lecturers. Knowledgeable, experienced and entertaining, he resides in Washington, D.C. For twenty years, while laying the foundation for his career in genealogy, he worked half-time at the Library of Congress and taught workshops at the National Archives."

John's course is filling up, so register now! With only eight courses left with seats remaining, now is the time to register. For more information, see http://www.infouga.org/aem.php?lv=p&epg=87.

Monday, September 7, 2015

Paula's advice on records and periodicals...


What record set do you believe is the most under-utilized? What advice would you give students in using this record set?

Many people ignore manuscript collections that are in libraries, historical societies, and archives all around the United States. The personal, business, and organizational papers hold family history details that are often not found since most are not online. Some personal papers include extensive genealogical research done by others, vital records, family relationships, and so much more. Learn how to access any indexes and finding aids and if you can, visit the place where some family details are held in the millions of manuscript collection that are waiting for us eager researchers.

What books and periodicals would you recommend for intermediate to advanced researchers? Are there any lesser-known texts you advise?

I suggest reading as many back issues of genealogy periodicals as you can for all your ancestral locations. The information found in these may not be described anywhere else. The cemetery or newspaper index may not be online or anywhere else. The first-hand account of researching in a specific library might only appear there. As for texts that are helpful I make great use of my guides to various repositories, the online guide to the National Archives (http://www.archives.gov/research/guide-fed-records/
) and guides that were published even ten or twenty years ago. The helpful information in these makes for good reading during breaks from research. I read several of the scholarly genealogical journals to be reminded of the research process in tough cases, of methodology to solve burning issues, and to gain insight into the minds of the authors. The footnotes often lead me to some exciting resource discoveries.

Paula's course is filling up, so register now! With only eight courses left with seats remaining, now is the time to register. For more information, see http://www.infouga.org/aem.php?lv=p&epg=87.

Friday, September 4, 2015

Stop by the Salt Lake Institute of Genealogy's booth at the Ogden Family History Conference!




The Salt Lake Instate of Genealogy will have a booth at the annual Ogden Family History Conference on Saturday, September 12th. It is held in the Shepherd Union building on the Weber State University campus in Ogden. There is no charge for the events or parking. 

There are 66 classes covering a wide range of subjects, a computer lab and one-on-one consultations in the Circle of Service.

If you are attending this event, please stop our booth. We look forward to seeing you there! For more information on this event, see https://familysearch.org/learn/wiki/en/Ogden_FamilySearch_Library_2015_Conference. Information on the Salt Lake Institute of Genealogy can be found at http://ugagenealogy.org/aem.php?eid=16.

Tuesday, September 1, 2015

Are you serious about your genealogical education?


Then the Salt Lake Institute of Genealogy (SLIG) can help you achieve your education goals!

Thomas W. Jones wrote an article, entitled Post-secondary Study of Genealogy: Curriculum and Its Contexts. In it he states that "[p]ractice that meets the field’s standards requires ethics, knowledge, and skill worthy of any college graduate. Genealogy has been accurately described as a “discipline” and characterized as “rigorous.”

With thirteen tracks to chose from, there is a topic that can help you improve your genealogical skills: 
  • Methodology courses covering advanced topics, legal concepts, evidence analysis, problem-solving and writing a quality family narrative. 
  • Records-based courses covering land and church records. 
  • Technology courses covering beginning to advanced DNA analysis. 
  • Location-based courses covering research in New York, the South, and the United States.
With only eight courses left with seats remaining, now is the time to register. For more information, see http://www.infouga.org/aem.php?lv=p&epg=87. Dr. Jones' article can be found at 
http://iijg.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/02/jones.pdf.

Thursday, August 27, 2015

Do You Have a Genealogical Problem?

Attend the Salt Lake Institute in 2016 and learn how to solve them like a professional!

Michael Hait, the course coordinator, recently shared the following on his blog, Planting the Seeds:




"Perhaps most exciting for me, however, is my opportunity to coordinate my own course this year: Course 9: Solving Problems Like a Professional. This course focuses on practical problem solving skills used by professional genealogists, designed to meet standards of genealogical proof as defined by the Board for Certification of Genealogists. Myself and all three of the other instructors are full-time genealogists, each with our own experience and professional focuses. The course will also have short homework assignments for the first three nights, allowing students to take advantage of the Family History Library and apply the lessons learned during the day.

Students for this course do not have to be professional genealogists or have any desire to be so. The lessons learned will be applicable to all research problems, during any time or place."
[1]

Michael's course is filling up, so register now! With only eight courses left with seats remaining, now is the time to register. For more information, see http://www.infouga.org/aem.php?lv=p&epg=87. More information on Michael can be found on his website: http://haitfamilyresearch.com/index.htm.


[1] Michael Hait, "Upcoming educational opportunities you can't miss!," Planting the Seeds blog, posted 17 June 2015 (https://michaelhait.wordpress.com : accessed 27 August 2015).

Monday, August 24, 2015

Michael Hait shares his favorite ancestor

In an interview with Thomas MacEntee, Michael answered the question "who is your favorite ancestor and why"?

It’s hard to pick a favorite ancestor. Some carry my interest because researching their lives involved breaking through significant brick walls. Others I am drawn to due to contributions to history. For example, I am directly descended from four Union soldiers, three Confederate soldiers, and one ancestor served in both armies during the Civil War. I am also directly descended from more than a dozen Revolutionary War soldiers, including a few officers. I have several ancestors who came to the U. S. before 1650, and have others who immigrated in the late nineteenth century. To me, it’s almost like asking a father to choose his favorite child. I love them all for different reasons.

One of the ancestors that I have spent quite a bit of time on would be “Elder” Henry Hait. He was a Primitive Baptist minister, first in Stamford, Connecticut, and then in central New York, ending up in Long Island. For years, both I and others researching his life thought he was born in Stamford. After all, his tombstone and the 1850 census both stated that he was born in Connecticut. But I struggled with this, because I could not find any reference to his father nor a reference to his own birth. Finally, I discovered, with the help of the Primitive Baptist Library in Carthage, Illinois, that he wrote an autobiography in a religious newspaper in New York. In the article he states that he was born in Bedford NY in 1779, but that his father died in 1780 and he was sent back to Stamford to live with his grandfather. Not only did the article clear up my concerns, and explain the negative evidence, it also provided a lot of insight into his personality. He was a very stern, religious man. I think that the amount of time, and the depth to which I combed through every aspect of his life in the course of researching him, adds to my appreciation of his life."

The entire interview can be found at http://www.geneabloggers.com/interview-michael-hait/. Michael's course is filling up, so register now! With only eight courses left with seats remaining, now is the time to register. For more information, see http://www.infouga.org/aem.php?lv=p&epg=87.

Wednesday, August 19, 2015

What is the best way to preserve your family history?

Writing a quality family narrative, of course!

SLIG is happy to have John Philip Colletta coordinate his course, "Writing a Quality Family Narrative" in January 2016. Using vivid examples and case studies, this course demonstrates how to compile your material; write biography; choose a numbering system; document, edit and proofread your text; and publish the saga of your family - on paper or electronically. Various lectures explore how to enliven your prose with family lore, treasured heirlooms, local history, maps, and illustrations. One in-class writing exercise with follow-up critique helps you improve practical skills, share your talents, and exchange ideas with the instructors and fellow students.

We caught up with John to ask him some questions, so that you could get to know him better.

When did you first start researching your family history? Was there a moment when you knew you were “hooked?”

One summer when I was 13 or 14 and whining about having nothing to do, my mother suggested I create a family tree. She had just read an article about it in Family Circle magazine. I began interviewing my two grandmothers and took to genealogy in a big way immediately.

Do you have a pet ancestor? Can you tell us a little bit about what makes this person so special to you as a researcher?

No, I have no “pet ancestor.” I feel particularly close to my mother’s mother’s parents, though, Andrew and Frances Noeth. They were born in Bavaria and came to Buffalo, New York, in 1886. Since my mother was very close to her grandparents (their back yards adjoined and the fence had a gate in it), I have heard more stories about Andrew and Frances Noeth than any other ancestors. It’s almost as though I knew them. Temperamentally, however, I feel a closer kinship to my father’s Sicilian ancestors.

You can read more about John's class at http://www.infouga.org/aem.php?lv=p&epg=87&eid=16
.

Monday, August 17, 2015

Pam Sayre's Advice on Under-Utilized Records

What record set to you believe is the most under-utilized? What advice would you give students in using this record set?


Most definitely court records, whether civil suits among family members or criminal case proceedings or federal actions. Court records are not among the easy records to be "cherry-picked" by new or inexperienced researchers, but they do yield some of the richest and most exciting details about ancestors who appear very few other places.

Start at the county level and look for indexes for divorce, civil proceedings, or criminal court cases. Bear in mind that not every person involved in a case will appear in an index, so you'll have to pay particular attention to collaterals and neighbors to find your ancestors. Search automated tools such as Lexis/Nexis for references to state supreme court cases that mention an ancestor. And at the federal level, visit the National Archives regional facility that holds the federal court records for the area where your ancestor.

Request and peruse docket books or any minutes of court records that exist for evidence of your ancestors' presence or dealings with the law. Even illiterate farmers knew how to use the legal system to sue siblings or other kin over a tiny piece of land or personal property!

Pam and Rick's Land Record course is filling up, so register now! With only eight courses left with seats remaining, now is the time to register. For more information, see http://www.infouga.org/aem.php?lv=p&epg=87.

Wednesday, August 12, 2015

Paula Stuart-Warren on...

Why would you recommend a student attend SLIG?


That’s an easy question but it has multiple answers. Let me list some of those: camaraderie, knowledge, networking, sharing, the other students, the experience, fun, and advancing our own family research. It’s almost like learning in the midst of an enlarged family who truly understands you. Best of all, this is the one Institute that gives us such close proximity to the fabulous Family History Library so we can put our knowledge to research use immediately.

Paula's course is filling up, so register now! With only eight courses left with seats remaining, now is the time to register. For more information, see http://www.infouga.org/aem.php?lv=p&epg=87.

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